Up-cycled knitting.

I’m kind of piggy-backing on yesterday’s post about my kind-of-lucrative hobby, but I must share a recent knitting mini-project I did one night this week.

I had discovered a tutorial on how to make yarn out of unwanted tee shirts. I have drawers full of tee shirts from various races, volunteer events, and… of course… impulse purchases. A year or so ago, I started making some into a quilt (which is now sitting half-finished in a box somewhere) but I had many left over. The tutorial was so easy to follow that I was able to knit washcloths and other small square items with the “yarn”.

potholderI hadn’t thought to do this in a long while, until earlier this week my fiance handed me a XXL plain army-green tee shirt that he had gotten for free but didn’t want. The thing was so large I could’ve made it into a pillow, but I realized, “Hey, this could make a ton of tee shirt yarn!”

And so it begun: I made a thing. Not just any “thing” – a pot-holder!

BASIC POT-HOLDER

You Need…

  • US size 9 straight needles
  • Tee shirt yarn
  • Finishing needle, for weaving in ends

Knitting Skills Needed…

  • Cast on
  • Cast off
  • Knit
  • Purl
  • Moss/seed stitch

Steps…

  1. Cast on 15 st using your favorite method (I use long-tail)
  2. (k1 p1) rep to end
  3. (p1 k1) rep to end (this is two rows of seed stitch)
  4. k1, p1, k to last 2 stitches, p1, k1
  5. p1, k1, p to last 2 stitches, k1, p1
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until it reaches a square length, ending in step 5
  7. Repeat steps 2 and 3
  8. Bind off, but do not break or cut the yarn
  9. Using tail, make a loop if you want to be able to hang your pot holder on a hook or something. I made my loop thicker by pulling the yarn in on itself a few times, making a chain-like strand.
  10. Tie the end of the loop at the last bound-off stitch. Break yarn.
  11. Weave in ends.

It’s very thick so I’m totally comfortable using this for holding hot pots and as a trivet. It took less than 20 minutes to make! Wham! Bam!

As far as my budget goes, this week has been easy. Having just gotten back from the holiday break, I have so much going on in the office that by the time I get home, I just cook, eat, exercise, shower, and go to bed – no time for fluff! But, this will change.

On Thursday night I am going to a trivia thing at a bar with coworkers. I’ll probably just get a pint of Guinness draft (usually cheap, and very filling so I will only need one) and something like soup or an appetizer for my meal. Goal: spend less than $20.

On Friday night I’m hosting a ladies night at my house, watching movies and drinking and eating. Luckily most folks will be bringing snacks and drinks, but I have to provide dinner. I have to make a decision: use what’s in my apartment, or buy stuff to make something else with. I have some frozen tortellini which are really yummy, and plenty of pasta sauce. But, most of the previous hosts made stuff from scratch, so I will kind of feel like a schmuck. I really want to make a quiche, but I’m low on eggs and have no cheese, so I’ll have to spend money on that stuff.

We’ll just have to wait and see what happens.

Weekly Allowance: $60.00
Weekly Allowance Remaining: $60.00

J